Posts tagged job

3 Things I Learned At a Pitch the Media Event

By: Jordyn Miller 

Recently, the Public Relations Professionals of Long Island (PRPLI) held its annual Meet and Pitch the Media event at the Hilton in Melville. This evening gives public relations professionals the opportunity to not only meet local Long Island media, but to also pitch their stories in person and receive constructive feedback on the spot. As an intern, pitching in person for the first time was extremely nerve-wracking, but Meet and Pitch the Media night was an incredible learning experience. Here are three things I learned just at this one event.

  1. Have confidence in your pitch!

While I was sitting at my table anticipating giving the pitch, I was anxious. I wondered what my criticisms would be, and the fact that I was the youngest professional there did not help. However, once I decided to stand up and volunteer myself for my pitch, I decided to not let my nerves overshadow my delivery. I confidently read the pitch, made eye contact with the panel, and finished the pitch in my allotted amount of time. The panel was extremely receptive, and they only had helpful comments about the pitch. They told me what they liked and what they would tweak, but at no point did I feel like my pitch was not good enough. Confidence really does make a difference.

  1. Don’t wait for someone to introduce you—do it yourself!

After the dinner concluded, all of the professionals in the room had the opportunity to speak to the media. My coworker who attended the event with me encouraged me to introduce myself to the media professionals and follow up on my pitch. It is important to remember to try to find something unique or something you have in common to begin the conversation. This helps sway the awkwardness while also making yourself memorable in their minds. Confidence is definitely applicable in this case as well.

  1. Take advantage of these opportunities!

Throughout my time at Zimmerman/Edelson, I have had multiple opportunities to meet media and network with other professionals. All of these events have made me eager to start my career in public relations, as well as reassured me that I will have a successful future. This PRPLI Meet and Pitch the Media event just reinforced the importance of these opportunities for me, and reminded me to never stop asking to tag along to events or gain any possible experience that I can.

prpli

The PRPLI panel at the Meet and Pitch the Media event

The Importance of Confidence in Public Relations

By: Jordyn Miller 

My second PRSSA networking dinner was a much less stressful event than the first.

My second PRSSA networking dinner was a much less stressful event than the first.

When I walked into my first ever networking dinner, I was completely overwhelmed. As any student would, I looked around at all of the professionals in the room and thought to myself “What am I doing here?” I was only a sophomore, barely knowledgeable from my one public relations class, and I could not imagine myself speaking to the professionals while all of these older and more experienced students would be sitting right beside me. Thankfully, one of my senior friends came up to me (I looked incredibly nervous) and he told me to just be confident. He said confidence is what stands out the most to anyone when you are speaking.

During the dinner, I slowly became more comfortable. I began to ask questions to the professionals sitting at my table, and the more questions I asked, the more confident I seemed. I soon realized that confidence can be created, and this is an important skill to have in any communications field. While I was still very nervous, I forced myself to speak and ask these questions to prove to the professionals I was speaking to that I am capable of confidently speaking to those I do not know.

This skill also came into play while I was interviewing for internships. Rather than timidly introducing myself to the interviewer and showing that I was nervous, I chose to confidently smile, shake the hand of the interview and introduce myself. This initial confidence will leave a wonderful impression of you on the interviewer, as they will be pleasantly surprised to see how prepared you are for the interview.

On my first day at Zimmerman/Edelson, I adopted this same concept. I walked into the office, and rather than show how overly nervous I was, I tried to introduce myself to everyone. I made myself known by speaking at the first staff meeting, participating in office conversations. I am not sure my Zimmtern experience would have been the same had I acted differently on my first day.

This confidence mentality has helped me when answering phones, sending my drafts to coworkers for the first time, meeting clients at events and just feeling like a part of the Zimmerman/Edelson team. I am confident that this will continue to benefit me throughout my public relations career.

The Hofstra PRSSA 2016 Regional Conference

By Jessica Avenia

Check out Jessica’s previous post about networking at the Hofstra PRSSA ‘Welcome to NY’ Mixer

We are constantly reminded about the importance of interning while at school and I agree; students should always look for opportunities to grow and better themselves professionally. I also believe students should be encouraged to join professional organizations just as much as they are encouraged to look for internships. Recently, I attended the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Regional Conference at Hofstra University, and I hope my experience will inspire students to find additional ways to be involved outside of the classroom, aside from getting an internship.

The PRSSA 2016 Regional Conference was an all-day event with the first workshop starting at 9:00 a.m. and the conference wrapping up around 5:00 p.m. To kick-off the weekend, the Welcome to New York Networking Mixer was well-attended the night prior. Several workshops were held throughout the day featuring panelists from various industries, including fashion, technology, entertainment, travel and tourism, international, nonprofit and more. There was definitely something there for everyone!

I chose to attend Live from NY! Entertainment PR in the City; Eat, Sleep and Travel: PR in the Food and Travel Industry; and Como se Dice PR? workshops. I was most excited about the travel PR workshop because I plan to work in the travel and tourism industry. I did, however, discover a new interest by attending the Como se Dice PR workshop. Despite being fluent in Spanish, it had never occurred to me to pursue a career in this fast-growing market, which shows how joining a professional organization and attending events like this one can help you define your interests and guide you towards the right career path.

All the panelists offered great insight on their industry, their own perspective on how to break in and many helpful PR tips. In addition to all the amazing panelists, the luncheon was accompanied by an encouraging keynote speech delivered by Edelman Vice President Ashley Chauvin. Mrs. Chauvin addressed the changing landscape of the PR industry, and stressed the idea that to be a great PR practitioner we must learn to be great storytellers—we must be aware of our surroundings and capture the moments that make a story connect with our audience.

Overall, my experience at the Hofstra PRSSA Regional Conference inspired me to work harder by meeting successful individuals who did more than just go to class when they were in my position. I’ve learned that it is important to stay connected and join professional groups that will support your career goals.

Dial ‘1’ for a Guide to Working the Phones

By Dan Schaefer

Riiiiiiing.

I stopped in my tracks and glared at the blinking device sitting to my left, its red, ominous light daring me to pick it up. It was silent for a moment. I wished the person on the other line realized they had dialed the wrong number and hung up.

Riiiiiiing.

Nope. The noise was no different to me than the classic sound of a haunting church bell from a horror movie.

I had received a very thorough, simple, and helpful training session on how to work the office phone system just hours earlier. Still, there’s a big difference between training and being thrown into a situation for the first time. A police officer’s first call. An actor’s first performance. An athlete’s first professional game. A public relations intern’s first time answering the office phone.

“Zimmerman/Edelson, this is Dan,” I whispered. “Yeah, is Robert available?” said the voice on the other end.

“Robert…Robert as in Robert Zimmerman, Robert?” I said, desperately hoping I hadn’t said the wrong name. I mean, in fairness to me, it was my first day at Zimmerman/Edelson, and the two founders first names were Robert and Ron. Pretty easy to mix-up.

“Yes…this is his father,” said the voice. “Please hold,” I answered.

I glanced over at Robert’s desk. Empty. Thinking back to my training, I had 30 seconds to get Robert on the phone. The clock was ticking, and knowing that someone was probably listening to some mundane hold music only added to the pressure. I mean nobody likes listening to that stuff.

After asking several people in the room where he was, I saw him through the window of the back office on what looked like was an important call. The door was shut and he had his back to the window. The idea of barging in on one of Robert Zimmerman’s important phone calls was not something I was hoping to do my first day. I somewhat expected someone to shout “Dead man walking!” as I nervously moved towards the door.

“Robert? Your father is on line one,” I said as I poked my head through the door. “I’m already on with him,” he answered as he moved the phone away from his face.

It took me a second to realize that in the half of a minute I was dealing with the call, it had already been taken care of. This gave me confidence.

For the rest of the day, I didn’t think of the phone like a time bomb. Rather, I looked at it as an opportunity to gain more experience. I found that in many cases the person on the other line needed something very simple.

I took messages for other employees and began to decipher their hand gestures when they were already on other calls. I transferred people to voicemail. I even went on the overhead intercom to announce someone was on the phone for an employee upstairs.

One of the first things I was taught at Zimmerman/Edelson was the fact that handling business through the phone in a professional and efficient way is key. Yet, I guarantee you will never see “How to Answer a Phone at your PR Internship” marked on any of your class syllabi as a topic of discussion. That’s because it’s just a small part of adjusting from being a student to an intern or even a professional, something I’ve just begun.

5 Tips to Ace Any Job Interview

By: Allie Giordano

1. Research the company before the interview. It’s so important to make sure you know the company’s core values and most important clients before you go into the interview.  Always be prepared to answer questions about the company. If you are not asked these questions, you can still refer to the interviewing company’s recent worjakek as a way to demonstrate your familiarity with the organization and your attention to detail.

2. Bring extra copies of your resume to the interview. There is no downside to being extra prepared. Maybe more than one person will be interviewing you, or perhaps the interviewer did not bother to print one out. It’s always better to go home with a stack of unused documents than to not have the one you need. Also: Make sure all papers are in a folder so they don’t get crumpled up.

3. Dress for success. In general, you should know where you’re applying to, and dress accordingly. You’re not going to dress the same for an interview with a financial institution as you would for one with a gardening organization, for example. But in any instance, it’s better to be overdressed then under dressed. Business casual is the way to go.

4. Arrive five to ten minutes early for the interview.  Always give yourself a little extra time in case your train is delayed or you can’t find the office right away.

5. Always have a question prepared to ask the person who interviews you. You will sound more engaged and interested if you ask a question about the company, particularly as it pertains to the position for which you are applying.